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The Risk of Online Shopping

Date Added: March 04, 2013 08:45:17 AM
Author: Admin
Category: Shopping: Online Shopping
The Risk of Online Shopping

The dangers of identity theft are well illustrated in the general press, but the reminders are worth reviewing for anyone with available credit and resources. Online shopping includes activities performed while using your smartphone, wireless laptop, or networked desktop at work. The technological innovation of hacker programmers unfortunately keep risk at a maximum when completing purchases online. The market for bulk data of this type is growing.

Online shopping involves layers of data concerning you and your habits. Where and when you browse, what preparations you make to buy goods online, and the type of method you use to make payment are part of this formula. Some hackers look for credit card data, some look for passwords or account links to your email, and some look for encryption data so they can break the encryption on a given vendor.

Hackers want your email password so they can use it to secure access to accounts online with preset credit card and payment data. Credit card histories at certain vendors make it easier for hackers to ship goods using those accounts to their drop postal addresses. Stalkers can also use social networking media pages such as Facebook to gain information about your schedule. The most commonly used passwords can be gleaned from these sites.
Hackers pay attention to data such as planned vacations and times away from the office. If a user feels they wont get hacked and they can rely on instant notification, these can be suppressed. And purchases made at 3 a.m. on a Monday morning may not be noticed until the start of the business day. Email access means these notifications might be deleted as well. A well orchestrated hacker campaign can stop payments on mortgages, cars, and credit lines critical to consumer well being. Social engineering is a technique hackers use to open accounts or purchase goods or services using personal information. Individuals should change their Facebook pages to private and contain the amount of occupational and financial information available from a casual Google search. Even team, community, or school web pages can share information that is better to remain private. Teenagers should be counseled not to chat in a manner that reveals residence addresses, family income, and time spent away from home.

Social engineering is a technique hackers use to open accounts or purchase goods or services using personal information. Individuals should change their Facebook pages to private and contain the amount of occupational and financial information available from a casual Google search. Even team, community, or school web pages can share information that is better to remain private. Teenagers should be counseled not to chat in a manner that reveals residence addresses, family income, and time spent away from home.

If consumers receive a confident “vibe" from the people they speak with, that is no guarantee hacks will not happen. Secondary and tertiary personnel may be responsible. Shopping online might also tempt employees to “borrow” your account for their own personal shopping and have their company chalk it up to error later. The risks of shopping online involve endangering family, friends and those with a target on their backs. This can include former disgruntled employees going after employers. nosy neighbors, and opportunistic identity thieves.

Slick operators can use their impersonation skills to change passwords, gain account access directly from vendors by phone, or stop other banking and financial services from happening. For example, if a hacker stopped automatic payment of a mortgage coupon, the consumer might fund their checking account with a flood of funds, and the hacker might tap into it. The hacker might also use e-checks to drain this account as soon as it is filled.

The best habits when using online accounts to reduce risk of identity theft are to change passwords frequently, not use obvious password conventions, and conserve use to SSL and better encryption when checking out. Shopping carts and online vendor software will signal when this is present. Another good sign is a Paypal or better Business Bureau insignia. When in doubt, close the window of a suspected phishing site or a shopping cart which is underperforming or asking for additional information. These are the most beneficial ways to reduce the risks of shopping online.

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